Green Tea: Twice as Nice

Other than the lovely earthy sweet taste of top-of-the-line green teas, what makes these teas so good?

There are two magical active ingredients in green tea namely, theanine and EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate). In 1949, Y Sakato published a paper on ‘the chemical constituents of tea’ in the Japanese journal of agriculture and food chemistry. He found that low-withered teas have a high amount of theanine (an amide), ...


Green Tea: Twice as Nice

Other than the lovely earthy sweet taste of top-of-the-line green teas, what makes these teas so good?

There are two magical active ingredients in green tea namely, theanine and EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate). In 1949, Y Sakato published a paper on ‘the chemical constituents of tea’ in the Japanese journal of agriculture and food chemistry. He found that low-withered teas have a high amount of theanine (an amide), which was then found to be able to reduce high blood pressure, promote relaxation, and inhibit caffeine’s side effects among others. Theanine also promotes alpha waves in the brain, which helps overcome phobias and has a general calming effect.

EGCG is a more recent discovery dating back to 2011 in a paper published by Seema Bhagwat, David Haytowitz and Joanne Holden for Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The most raved about property of EGCG is that it accelerates weight loss without any adverse effects on the human body. It is also believed to clear out clogged blood vessels, if consumed regularly. A bonded complex of EGCG that is found in tea is theaflavin, which is the antioxidant polyphenol believed to hold a thousand benefits. These range from lowering risk of cancer to battling diabetes to improving eyesight and sexual performance.

So, hopping onto the green tea bandwagon isn’t just a step towards appreciating finery but also towards a healthy future. Indulge in the healthiest sin.

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